Our Easter Journey

foot washing 03

This year I asked the people of our congregation who gathered for worship over the Easter weekend to imagine themselves going on a three-day journey, following Jesus along the path of his last supper, suffering, death and resurrection.

The journey began on Thursday evening as we followed Jesus to the table. We were welcomed by people who offered to wash our feet in the same way that Jesus washed his disciples’ feet at his last supper with them. The washing of feet shows us that Jesus comes to us as a servant, taking on the role of the lowest household slave, doing the scummiest job in the house for us. In doing this, Jesus gives us an example to follow (John 13:15), and teaches us that his followers will adopt the same posture in relationship to others.

Then, Jesus gives us a new command – to love each other in the same way he loves us (John 13:34). We can only know how to love others in Jesus’ way after we have experienced the love Jesus has for us. That means allowing him to wash our feet, and maybe even to allow others to wash our feet on his behalf. That’s not easy. We often like to think discipleship is more about what we do that what Jesus does for us, but it leads us into the rest of this weekend’s journey, as we encounter Jesus’ love so we can then show that same love to others.

In a lot of ways, that’s discipleship: learning to love like Jesus by being loved by Jesus.

Jesus continues to show us his grace-filled love on the Thursday evening as he then adopts the role of the host of the meal. He serves us again as our host, physically giving himself to us through the bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper. This simple meal is Jesus’ self-giving act of love to us. We can hold back parts of ourselves in our relationships with others, but not Jesus. He gives all of himself to us and fills us with his goodness by making us members of his living, breathing body in the world.

We then followed Jesus to the cross on Friday morning. As we again heard the story of Jesus’ betrayal, trial, suffering, death and burial, we followed him in faith to witness his sacrifice for us all.

crucifixion 05Everything in the gospels leads us to the cross so that we can experience the grace of God. As we follow Jesus to the cross we can find grace that frees us from guilt, regret and shame. We can find grace that heals our wounded and broken hearts and souls as the Son of God enters into our brokenness, is wounded for us, and gives us healing with his love. We can find grace that gives us hope in dark times, as the Son of God experiences being abandoned by his Father, finds us when we feel abandoned by God, and is the presence of God with us in even the darkest of times. We can find grace that gives life as Jesus takes our death on himself, because if he takes our death on the cross, then all that is left behind for us is life.

I believe this is the ultimate goal of discipleship: to follow Jesus to the cross to encounter his life-giving and life-changing grace.

We saw how strong his love and life is, then, when we followed Jesus to the empty tomb on Easter Sunday morning.
We can think of Jesus’ resurrection as an historical event, or as the promise that one day Jesus will return to raise our bodies from our graves to eternal life. However, we can also understand the empty tomb the way Paul describes the resurrection in Colossians 3:1 where he writes:

empty tomb 02Since you have been raised to new life with Christ, set your sights on the realities of heaven, where Christ sits in the place of honour at God’s right hand. (NLT)

Here, and in other places (such as Romans 6:4, Ephesians 2:4-6), Paul talks about the resurrection as a present reality for those who are in Christ Jesus through faith. That means that Jesus’ resurrection is our resurrection!

To be a follower of Jesus means following him to the empty tomb to see that we have been given a new life as God’s resurrected people through faith in Jesus. That is where one journey ends, and another begins. Our Easter journey concluded as we saw that the life of Christ is stronger than anything in this world, and so, whatever we are experiencing in this life, God’s final word to us is life! But a new journey starts for us as Jesus’ followers as we begin to discover what this resurrection life looks like in the day-to-day realities of this world. This is a life that is lived by faith, trusting that Jesus’ life is stronger than anything we might encounter along the way, and then living like this is true. Paul describes the resurrected life of Christ as consisting in compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, patience, forgiveness, love (like 1 Corinthians 13 describes), peace and thankfulness (Colossians 3:12-15). Discipleship in the light of the empty tomb means learning to live this kind of life as God’s resurrected people in this world.

Over the three days of Easter we followed Jesus to the table where he served us with his love, to the cross where we encounter his grace, and to the empty tomb where we see that we have been raised to a new kind of life in him. Our discipleship journey will continue, always in the light of the table, the cross and the empty tomb, as Jesus goes ahead of us into whatever the future holds, and as we follow him in his love, grace, and life.

More to think about:

  • People are often reluctant to let us wash their feet on Maundy Thursday. Why is it hard for us to allow others to serve us? Why is it vital for Jesus’ followers to learn what it is to be loved by Jesus before we can love others?
  • I have described discipleship as basically learning to love like Jesus. What do you like or dislike about this definition? How might your life be different if it was all about learning to love like Jesus?
  • When Jesus called people to follow him, ultimately he led them to his cross so they can find grace. How can the experience of God’s grace to us in Jesus give us what we need to show that same grace to others?
  • Do you tend to think of Jesus’ resurrection as something that is more about the past, present or future? How might today look different to you if you approached it as a person who is risen to new life with Jesus?
  • What do you like or dislike about the idea of discipleship as learning to live every day as a person who has been raised to new life with Jesus? How might your life be different if you lived like Jesus’ resurrection was real for you now?
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2 thoughts on “Our Easter Journey

  1. I prefer the idea of discipleship as learning to live every day as a person who has been raised to new life with Jesus, rather than discipleship as learning to love like Jesus as I think it is too easy with the second one to not have a relationship with Jesus and just be a loving person to those around you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Tamara – one reason I’m using a lot of different images of Discipleship is to try to find what connects with people so we can formulate a strategy that people will identify with & participate in. We’ll keep working on it… 🙂

      Like

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