‘Hosanna!’ (Matthew 21:1-11)

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One week out from Easter, on a day we know as Palm Sunday, Christians commemorate an event in Jesus’ life which points towards the culmination of his ministry. Jesus entered Jerusalem, the Jewish capital, and as we read in Matthew 21:1-11, a very large crowd gathered to welcome him. they lay their outer garments and tree branches on the road in front of him as Jesus rode on a donkey. Then the crowd acknowledged Jesus as the heir of King David who would come to save them by shouting,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!”
“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”
“Hosanna in the highest heaven!” (Matthew 21:9 NIV)

This word Hosanna has been used in lots of different Christian songs and hymns over the centuries, particularly in those written for Palm Sunday or which acknowledge Jesus as King. But what does it mean? Like a lot of words we can use in Christian conversations, songs, hymns and worship, it can be good for us to give some thought to its meaning and why we use it.

Literally Hosanna means, ‘Save!’ It is used in Psalm 118:25 to ask God to send his Messiah to liberate his people and give them ‘success’ (NIV) in all they did. When the people of Jerusalem used it to welcome Jesus to their city, they were using this ancient term to point to him as the one who would save them by freeing them from tyranny and restoring them as the people of God.

When I think about how we use the word ‘save’ in our place and time, there are aspects to its meaning which can help us understand more about what the word Hosanna means for us. For example, as I wrote this message out on my computer, I will regularly ‘save’ my work so I don’t lose it but can keep it to send out to you. When I go to the beach to swim, there might be a ‘life-saver’ to look out for me and rescue me when I get into trouble. When I go to the shops, I will generally look for specials so I can ‘save’ some money off my grocery bill.

However, most of the time when I hear the word ‘save’ I tend to think about money boxes. These are boxes of various shapes and sizes which we can use to save our money, especially our coins or small change. We save coins in money boxes because they are valuable to us. We save them because we might not want other people in our household from taking them from us. We might also save them because, when we add them to other loose change we have saved in our money box, they become part of something greater than themselves and are able to purchase something more expensive than if they had remained on their own.

The main way Christians often think about being ‘saved’ is going to heaven when we die. I wonder, though, when we sing Hosanna this Palm Sunday, we might be calling on Jesus to save us in ways that aren’t too different from the ways we can save our coins.

Like my coins, when we call Hosanna, Jesus saves us because we are valuable to him. 1 Peter 1:18-19 tells us that God didn’t save us with perishable things like silver or gold, but with ‘the precious blood of Christ, the sinless, spotless Lamb of God’ (NLT). Jesus rode into Jerusalem to save us because we are worth more to God than all the silver and gold in the world. God gives the most valuable thing he has, the life of his own Son, to make us his own because that’s what you are worth to him. When we cry Hosanna, Jesus saves us because to him we are worth it.

Like my coins, when we call Hosanna, Jesus also saves us because he wants to keep us safe. Especially during this time when our church buildings are closed, we’re practising social distancing and we are isolated from each other, it is good for us to trust that Jesus saves us to keep us safe. Whether we are afraid of how COVID-19 might affect us or our loved ones, we are anxious about the future, or feeling lonely and disconnected from others, Jesus keeps us safe by embracing us in his resurrection love and surrounding us with the light of his good news. It doesn’t mean the we won’t have problems or suffering in life, but when they do come, we can be confident that they won’t overcome us and we have Jesus’ resurrection life in us. When we cry Hosanna, Jesus saves us by keeping us safe.

Like my coins, when we call Hosanna, Jesus saves us by making us a part of something bigger than ourselves. Jesus rode into Jerusalem as King, not of a temporary, earthly kingdom, but of the eternal Kingdom of God. Jesus makes us part of his Kingdom which includes all people who are saved from every time and every place. This is the family of God, the body of Christ, the community of God’s holy people, the Christian Church. As we face a period of isolation because of the COVID-19 virus, we are never truly alone. God brings us into community with other believers so we can encourage each other, build each other up in faith and love, strengthen each other and walk with each other until God brings us through this time and we can be physically present with each other again. When we cry Hosanna, Jesus saves us by making us citizens of the Kingdom of Heaven, his living, breathing body on earth.

This Palm Sunday, what does it mean to you to be saved? A greater sense of self-worth? Being kept safe from things that might take life from you? Being part of something bigger than ourselves, even while we might be isolated or alone? Or it might mean something different. Jesus rode into Jerusalem as God’s chosen King who comes to us here and now to give us his saving help. Where do you need his saving help in your life?

As we sing Hosanna, Jesus comes to save us all…

More to think about & discuss:

  • When you read this story, what questions do you have?
  • How do you understand what it means to be ‘saved’?
  • When we think about being saved like coins in a money box, what connects more with where you are in your life: Jesus giving you value, keeping you safe or connecting you to something bigger than yourself? Or something else? Explain why…
  • How might trusting that you are a saved child of God help you see what you are going through right now a bit differently?